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Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Services

Citrus County Health Department


We provide confidential:

  • Testing
  • Treatment
  • Information about sexually transmitted infections (STIs)
  • Partner services (for partners of those with an STI)

Hours and appointments: We always try to accomodate walk-ins, but appointments are preferred.

Did you know?

  • STIs are common
  • Over half of all new STIs are diagnosed in young people ages 15-24
  • Most of the time STIs don't cause symptoms so people often don't know they have a STI
  • The most common STI, Human papillomavirus (HPV), can be prevented with a vaccine
  • STI testing is easy and some STIs can be cured with treatment

There are steps you can take to protect yourself and your partners from STIs. All STIs can be treated and some can be cured.

Common STIs

Human papilloma virus (HPV): the most common STI

  • HPV is an infection that can spread from person to person through touch and it's so common that most people will get it at some point in their lives. HPV can affect the genitals, mouth and throat, and the rectum. There is not a routine test for every part of the body it can affect but it can be prevented with a vaccine. Using condoms can also lower the risk of getting or sharing HPV but condoms don't cover all the skin that might touch during sexual activity.
  • More information on HPV

Chlamydia: the most common bacterial STI

  • Chlamydia is a common bacterial infection that can spread from person to person through sexual fluids, like semen and vaginal and anal fluids. Chlamydia can affect the genitals, mouth and throat, and the rectum. People who are sexually active should be tested for chlamydia regularly (once a year or before having new sexual partners). Chlamydia can be cured with antibiotics. Using condoms each time someone has sexual intercourse can prevent chlamydia by preventing contact with sexual fluids during intercourse.
  • More information on chlamydia

Gonorrhea: bacterial STI

  • Gonorrhea is a bacterial infection that is becoming more common than it used to be. It can be spread from person to person through sexual fluids, like semen and vaginal and anal fluids. Gonorrhea can affect the genitals, mouth and throat, and the rectum. People who are sexually active should be tested regularly (once a year or before having a new sexual partner). Gonorrhea can be cured with antibiotics. Using condoms each time someone has sexual intercourse can prevent gonorrhea by preventing contact with sexual fluids during intercourse.
  • More information on gonorrhea

Herpes: a common viral nfection

  • Herpes is a common infection caused by a virus that can spread from person to person through touch. It is so common that 1 in 3 people will have it at some point in their lives. Not everyone who has herpes will have symptoms, so people don't always know they have it. It can affect the genitals, mouth, and the rectum. Testing for herpes is not routinely recommended unless someone has symptoms of herpes. There is no cure for herpes, but it can be managed with medication. Using condoms each time someone has sexual intercourse can lower the chances of getting or sharing herpes but condoms don't cover all of the skin that might touch during sexual activity.
  • More information on herpes

Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS)

  • HIV is a viral infection that can be spread from person to person through contact with blood or sexual fluids like semen and vaginal and anal fluids. HIV can be spread during sexual intercourse, through sharing needles/syringes or other injection drug supplies, or during pregnancy from mother to child. HIV is easy to prevent by using condoms during sexual intercourse, always using new needles and syringes, and by getting HIV treatment if someone is living with HIV. HIV can be treated with daily medication to prevent the infection from developing into AIDS and lower the chances of being able to spread HIV to another person. Everyone should be tested for HIV regularly. Talk with a nurse or doctor about how often you should be tested for HIV.
  • More information on HIV